Can a paleo diet benefit Atopic Dermatitis (eczema) ?

Although the following study is not specifically regarding a ‘paleo lifestyle and diet’, when you read what foods they excluded and what foods they included which gave the patients the greatest improvement you could say they were following a basic paleo example.

 

In a study published in Jan 2017 in relation to dietary modification in patients with Atopic Dermatitis (AD), 87% of patients reported trialling some form of dietary exclusion – the most common exclusions being junk food, dairy and gluten.

Eczema-Infographic

Over 53% of patients reported the best improvement when they removed white flour products, 51.4% with gluten and 51.4% nightshades.

Now a large percentage (79.9%) also added things to their diets such as vegetables, fish oils and fruits,.

The best improvement in the patients skin was reported with adding vegetables at 47.6%, 39.5% when adding organic foods, and 35% when adding fish oil!

vegetables-752153_960_720

 

From this study it was concluded ‘the role of diet in AD and potential nutritional benefits and risks need to be properly discussed with patients’. True yes, but it does really go to show you how much the diet can affect our health!!!!

By eliminating chemicals associated with wheat and pesticides in general, not to mention what it actually does to the gut lining when eaten, increasing fibre content to increase elimination capacity (pooping), adding in fish oil which we know omega 3 can be beneficial for eczema prevention and for balancing the now skewed omega 3:6 ratio, and elimination of nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and tomatillos) which can help heal up the leaky gut (intestinal permeability).

So really it’s no wonder cleaning up the diet can and did affect these patients and their skin condition so much!

Why would you say paleo is dangerous? Why would you say the ‘common sense’ aspect of eating more vegetables and cleaner foods, and less gluten/wheat, and junk food would cause someone harm? Why would need a degree to suggest that to people?

Stacey Kirsch – Adelaide Paleo Organiser, Student Nutritionist and Student Personal Trainer.

References:
Nosrati A, Afifi L, Danesh MJ et al 2017, ‘Dietary modifications in atopic dermatitis‘, Journal of Dermatological Treatment, vol. 24, pp.1-19.
Koch C, Dolle S, Metzger M 2008, ‘Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation in atopic eczema: a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial‘, British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 158, no. 4, pp.786-92.
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